NYHA Functional Classification for Congestive Heart Failure. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification provides a simple way of classifying the extent of heart failure.It places patients in one of four categories based on how much they are limited during physical activity; the limitations/symptoms are in regard to normal breathing and varying degrees in shortness of breath and/or angina. The above heart failure classification table is a much-needed table in this modern world where a large number of heart attacks are observed. Calculate is a next-generation clinical calculator and decision support tool freely available to the medical community. Class I patient between 50 and 65 years old: HBG, BUN, CR, GLU, UA and EKG Class I patient 65 years and over, Class II, Class III, IV and V: CBC, CMP, UA, EKG Class II under 50 years old shall only require an EKG if indicated by the presence of a relevant medical history referable to the heart; i.e., hypertension (HTN), etc. Introduction.

The Killip classification is a system used in individuals with an acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), taking into account physical examination and the development of heart failure in order to predict and stratify their risk of mortality. 1 The ease of application of this classification based on patients' reported symptoms has resulted in widespread use in many heart failure (HF) studies 2, 3 and international guidelines. In 1928 the New York Heart Association published a classification of patients with cardiac disease based on clinical severity and prognosis. NYHA classification represents the overall functional status of the patient in relationship to both heart failure and angina. Canadian Cardiovascular Society grading of angina pectoris Grade Description Grade I Ordinary physical activity does not cause angina, such as walking and climbing stairs. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification for Heart Failure stratifies severity of heart failure by patient-reported symptoms. Predictors of pregnancy complications in women with congenital heart disease. >7 Class II Slight limitation of physical activity. A moderate strength of association between KPS and NYHA (Kendall’s Tau-b correlation Address correspondence to: Miriam J. Johnson, MD, This system relates symptoms to everyday activities and the patient's quality of life. It classifies patients in one of four categories based on their limitations during physical activity; the limitations/symptoms are in regards to normal breathing and varying degrees in shortness of breath and or angina pain. Predicted KPS from NYHA class rounded to the nearest 10 gave the following values: Class I, predicted KPS 90%; Class II, predicted KPS 80%; Class III, predicted KPS 70%; and Class IV, predicted KPS 60%.